Think first then dial
 
Triple Zero
Police, Fire, Ambulance
in an emergency
 
131 444
Police Assistance Line
for non-urgent police assistance
 
1800 333 000
Crime Stoppers
report crime anonymously

Countering violent extremism

How you can help South Australia Police make our community safer

If you become aware of someone radicalising toward violent extremism, please report it immediately to the National Security Hotline on 1800 123 400 (you can remain anonymous). Alternatively you can report it to Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or local police on 131 444. National Security Hotline 1800 123 400

Your actions in doing so will contribute to helping make South Australia (and Australia) a safe place to live, work and visit and could prevent a friend, relative or colleague from being involved in criminal and dangerous behaviour.

The overwhelming majority of Australians would like to live in a safe environment and find the actions of terrorist groups abhorrent. One of Australia's greatest strengths is our harmonious, diverse, multicultural, multi-faith community. We need to preserve and protect that.

Freedom of thought, speech and beliefs are important rights in our society and radical thinking can positively transform a country's political and social landscape for the better. However using violence, or supporting its use to achieve ideological, political or social change is not acceptable - this is violent extremism.

Preventing violent extremism is a whole of community responsibility - we all need to work together to ensure people are not allowed to radicalise and commit acts of terrorism.

Providing information to authorities provides an avenue for intervention and prevention. It does not mean that providing information about a person will result in them being criminally charged. Police and other authorities will work with agencies and communities to prevent a person becoming a criminal – your early advice could in fact help a person who is on the wrong path get back on track and return to being a good citizen.  Late advice may be just too late for intervention and risks the safety of everyone involved.

One of the main issues confronting us at the moment is people trying to travel overseas to fight with terrorist groups. You should know the following:

  • If you fight illegally in overseas conflicts, you face up to life in prison upon your return to Australia.
  • Legislation recently passed by the Parliament seeks to ensure that as far as humanly possible, if you leave this country to engage in terrorism and you come back to this country, you will be arrested, prosecuted and jailed.
  • We know there are some young Australians and others who think they've made the right choice in becoming involved in overseas conflicts, but that choice only adds to the suffering in Syria and Iraq – and it's putting those young Australians themselves and others in mortal danger.

The reality is that friends, families and local communities are likely to be the first to see changes in a person who is radicalising or thinking about travelling to participate in a foreign conflict.

Friends, families and communities are also going to be the very people that might be able to reach a vulnerable young person before they go too far down the wrong path.

Let's all work together to prevent people radicalising to violent extremism -  it is much better to prevent than it is to respond after the fact. By working together, we can dissuade people from becoming criminals and save their life and the life of other people.

If you become aware of someone radicalising toward violent extremism, please report it immediately to the National Security Hotline on 1800 123 400 (you can remain anonymous). Alternatively you can report it to Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or local police on 131 444.  If it doesn't add up, ring up.

Related information

Read more about the current National Terrorism alert level at SA Police News.

Download SAPOL's Countering Violent Extremism brochure.

Emergency preparedness fact sheets - find important information on how to be prepared for a disaster and what to do after a disaster